Orchid Flowers – How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Orchid Flowers – How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Growing Orchids

There’s an elegant flower waiting to take your breath away, composed of three inner petals, three outer petals, and a cupped petal that stands out from the rest.

Names such as labellum, inflorescence, sepal – these anatomical parts all ring as fabulous as they sound. Almost as if it has the aura of being extraterrestrial, the whole exotic composition takes on a charm of its own. The abundance coupled with the intricate details makes it look like it is a work of art.

You shouldn’t be afraid of the orchid culture if you are new to it. Orchids exhibit many beautiful characteristics that will encourage our interest in them as well as preserve the environment. If you just take the time to get to know what the orchid needs, you will find many varieties of orchids to be easy to grow.

This isn’t the same as the traditional potted plants you buy in stores. This unique plant can be identified by its epiphytic nature, meaning that it does not grow in the dirt but rather hangs on the bark of trees. The Lady Slipper is among the few varieties of orchids that grow on the forest floor of the jungle and is considered to be semi-terrestrial.

History of Orchid Flowers

There is no doubt that Orchidaceae is the most elegant and beautiful family of flowering plants that have existed for over a million years. Throughout the ages, the orchid family has thrived and expanded, putting up a fight against not only evolution but Mother Nature herself, as well as the exploitation of their most profound adversary-the Man.

It has been estimated that about 114 million years ago when dinosaurs roamed the planet, the world was graced by a flower growing plant that we now call the orchid, described as one of the most beautiful and delicate flowers. While many plants and animals suffered from the effects of evolution, the orchid thrived, making it available across the globe except Antarctica.

Since ancient times, the orchid has been a symbol of love, luxury, and beauty. To the ancient Greeks, the orchid represented real strength, and to the Chinese, it was known as “the plant of kings.”

In the Middle Ages, the orchid would be considered aphrodisiac and put into love potions.

It wasn’t until the 18th century that orchid collecting became a serious pursuit as their rarity from the time-limited their popularity to a few botanists and wealthy consumers. Among the first people to experience, were William Cattley, who became the first person to ever bloom his own orchids in 1811. This event changed the flower world forever. There were millions of orchids stripped from forests, which led to many of these plants becoming endangered.

Thousands of dollars could be spent on a single orchid. There have been many campaigns worldwide to put an end to this practice, and now most of the varieties of orchids are bred and cultivated especially for sales.

If you want to know more about the history of orchids, there is a great PDF at reasearchgate.net!

Varieties of Orchid Flowers

All kinds of orchids can thrive in a wide variety of environments, including mountaintop, bog, grassland, and rainforest. More than 35,000 varieties of orchids inhabit our planet, and there is a good chance that many more unknown varieties of orchids will be discovered in the future.

In order to simplify our list, we will cover only the varieties of orchids that are widely grown.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Cattleyas have earned the reputation as the “Queen of Orchids” and are known to the public as the ultimate in floral corsages. While some naturally occurring species are offered by growers, the most popular plants are man-made hybrids derived from combining Cattleyas with some of their close relatives to produce a wide range of colors, sizes, and forms.

Temperature: The ideal day temperature is 75-85 degrees F., while the ideal night temperature is 60-65 degrees F. Occasional temperature extremes are tolerated if exposure is not prolonged.

Light: Cattleyas and their relatives require a good amount of light. They enjoy full sun in the morning, but will require shading from about 11 am-3 pm; less shading will be necessary for the late afternoon. Their leaves should be a light green color, and a darker green color indicates too little sun.

Water: Basically, cattleyas grow best when their potting medium becomes dry in between waterings. These plants are epiphytes in nature, (i.e. growing on top of trees) and are used to drying out between the rains of their natural habitat.

Repotting: Cattleyas should not be repotted unless the plant has outgrown the pot (every 2 or 3 years) or when the potting medium begins to deteriorate. Or when the mixture becomes sour, does not drain rapidly, and is invaded by snow mold or shows green mold on the surface. A coarse medium such as medium-grade Fir-bark, or coarse-grade Fir-bark will work well.

Feeding: High-nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) can be used year-round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Cutting Dead Flower Spike: When the last flower drops, cut your flower spike all the way down the stem. Apply a pinch of cinnamon powder or melted candle to seal the wound. Continue caring for it and wait for a possible rebloom.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The popularity of miniature Cymbidium is now spreading from Asia to the worldwide orchid community. These ancient flowers have been treasured, in numerous societies, for nearly two thousand years. Many orchid lovers are most charmed by its fragrance and form rather than its petite size.

Temperature: Cymbidium will tolerate considerable summer heat as long as they get cool, mild night temperatures (between 50-65 degrees F.). Cold weather, even down to 28 degrees F. for a few hours each night, will not damage an acclimatized plant, but once the plant spikes or flowers, it should be protected from temperatures below 35 degrees F. Regardless, plants should always be kept free of frost.

Light: Your Cymbidium enjoys the morning and afternoon sun most, yet should be protected from the hot mid-day sun. A light green leaf with just a hint of yellow indicates the maximum amount of sun the plant can take, and a dark green leaf indicates not enough sun.

Water: Watering of Cymbidium is a delicate balancing act. They should not be allowed to go dry, yet they don’t care for a soggy environment either. Watering once every seven to ten days is about right. As with everything else, special consideration must be given to the drying effects of varying ambient air temperature and humidity.

Feeding: High nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) should be used from February until July, while low nitrogen fertilizers (6-25-25) should be used from August until January. Feed one teaspoon to a gallon of water once a month.

Repotting: Repot every two to three years from February to June with a well-draining medium. Fine bark is suitable in mild summer climates, while a finer medium Orchid Mix works well in warmer summer areas.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Dendrobium orchids are called “Phalaenopsis type” because their flowers resemble those of the Phalaenopsis variety. Phalaenopsis types are evergreen, while other varieties of Dendrobiums shed their leaves in the fall and winter. Dendrobiums are also commonly used as cut flowers because of their sturdy stems and distinctive coloring.

Temperature: The ideal day temperature is 75-85 øF, while the ideal night temperature is 60-65 øF. Occasional temperature extremes are tolerated if exposure is not prolonged.

Light: These dendrobiums enjoy the full morning sun, but will require shading between 11 am and 3 pm – less shading will be needed in the late afternoon. An overhead light source is most effective.

Water: Phalaenopsis-type dendrobiums grow best when their potting medium becomes dry between waterings. They are epiphytes in nature, (i.e. – they grow on trees) and are accustomed to becoming fairly dry between the rains of their natural habitat.

Repotting: Repot once every two years in Spring, after blooming, or when new growth starts. A mix of 10 parts fine-grade Fir-bark and 1 part orchid mix will work well in 6″ pots and smaller, while medium-grade Fir-bark works well in larger pots.

Feeding: High-nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) can be used year-round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The popularity of the Miltonia orchid is increasing rapidly, thanks in part to the development of rigorous hybrid methods that can produce plants in greater quantities. Because of the familiar shape and markings of these spectacular flowers, Miltonia’s are often called “Pansy Orchids.” Their richly colored flowers blossom profusely. Although they may last for up to a month, their bloom time is as short as that of a cut flower. Miltonia can easily be cultured at home or in a greenhouse. They normally bloom in the spring or fall.

Temperature: The ideal day temperature is 75-80 degrees F., while the ideal night temperature is 60-65 degrees F. Occasional temperature extremes are tolerated if exposure is not prolonged. As long as you keep the temperature reasonable, you should have a healthy plant.

Light: Bright diffused light is necessary to bring Miltonia into bloom; this can include a little sun (not direct sunlight) for up to two hours a day.

Water: Unlike some orchids that require a drying out period, Miltonia grows throughout the entire year and must be kept evenly moist. Drench the plant in the early morning and let them dry out before nightfall. Once a week watering during the winter and twice a week during summer is normally sufficient.

Repotting: Miltonia’s are considered epiphytes, which means that a general bark or orchid mix should suit them well. Repot your Miltonia at least once every 2 years or when the potting medium begins to decay.

Feeding: High-nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) can be used year-round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The Odontoglossum varieties of orchids are becoming very popular for ease of growing and long-lasting sprays of small, distinct flowers which often have unique color combinations and a pleasant fragrance. They will typically bloom once a year and can be grown in the home, as well as in a sheltered area in the garden. Odontoglossum has been combined with Oncidiums and other related orchid types through hybridizing to offer a seemingly endless array of striking color patterns.

Temperature: Most Odontoglossum and their hybrids enjoy intermediate temperature ranges: 75-85 degree F. day & 60-65 degree F. at night.

Light: Most Odontoglossums and their hybrids prefer filtered, subdued light (from 1000 to 1500 ft. candles). The Oncidiums prefer bright light. The leaves should be bright green as opposed to dark green or reddish-green. Reddish green indicates too much light; dark green indicates not enough light.

Water: Odontoglossums should become moderately dry between waterings. Generally, they require more water while the new shoot is growing and less once the bulb has formed. Fertilize your plants at least once a month. Take care to keep water out of the new growth at the base of the plant. Never allow the bottom of the pot to stand in water. Never use artificially softened water.

Humidity: Odontoglossums enjoy moist air, requiring a minimum of 40-50% humidity in the immediate vicinity of the plant. Humidity should be increased with higher temperatures. The ideal humidity is between 55 and 75%, with as much ventilation or air movement as possible without any cold drafts. Humidity can be increased around the plant by placing the pot on an inverted saucer in a baking pan filled with pebbles, rock chips, etc., and water. Keep water level below the top of pebbles so that the plant will not have “wet feet” from setting in water. Morning misting of foliage is also helpful, especially during periods of hot weather.

Repotting: Repot Odontoglossums at least every two years. As a general rule, repot them when the new shoot is two to three inches tall or when new roots appear. All the old mix should be removed from the roots and any dead roots should be removed. If dividing, keep the divisions in clumps of three to five mature bulbs. Medium to fine fir bark is preferred. The base of the new growth should be potted about ½” (no deeper) into the fresh bark. Keep mix barely damp until you see the new roots penetrating the bark, then resume normal watering.

Feeding: High-nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) can be used year-round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The Oncidium varieties of orchids are becoming very popular for ease of growing and long-lasting sprays of small, distinct flowers which often have unique color combinations and a pleasant fragrance. They will typically bloom once a year and can be grown in the home, as well as in a sheltered area in the garden. Oncidium has been combined with Odontoglossum and other related orchid types through hybridizing to offer a seemingly endless array of striking color patterns.

Temperature: Most Oncidiums and their hybrids enjoy intermediate temperature ranges: 75-85 degree F. day & 60-65 degree F. at night.

Light: Most Oncidium and their hybrids prefer filtered, subdued light (from 1000 to 1500 ft. candles). The Oncidiums prefer bright light. The leaves should be bright green as opposed to dark green or reddish-green. Reddish green indicates too much light; dark green indicates not enough light.

Water: Oncidiums should become moderately dry between waterings. Generally, they require more water while the new shoot is growing and less once the bulb has formed. Fertilize your plants at least once a month. Take care to keep water out of the new growth at the base of the plant. Never allow the bottom of the pot to stand in water. Never use artificially softened water.

Humidity: Oncidiums enjoy moist air, requiring a minimum of 40-50% humidity in the immediate vicinity of the plant. Humidity should be increased with higher temperatures. The ideal humidity is between 55 and 75%, with as much ventilation or air movement as possible without any cold drafts. Humidity can be increased around the plant by placing the pot on an inverted saucer in a baking pan filled with pebbles, rock chips, etc., and water. Keep water level below the top of pebbles so that the plant will not have “wet feet” from setting in water. Morning misting of foliage is also helpful, especially during periods of hot weather.

Repotting: Repot Oncidiums at least every two years. As a general rule, repot them when the new shoot is two to three inches tall or when new roots appear. All the old mix should be removed from the roots and any dead roots should be removed. If dividing, keep the divisions in clumps of three to five mature bulbs. Medium to fine fir bark is preferred. The base of the new growth should be potted about ½” (no deeper) into the fresh bark. Keep mix barely damp until you see the new roots penetrating the bark, then resume normal watering.

Feeding: High-nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) can be used year-round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The Paphiopedilum or Lady’s Slipper is by far one of the most unique and intriguing of all orchids. Its exotic, wax-like, richly colored blooms last for weeks and sometimes months. Lady’s Slippers have no pseudobulbs but feature attractive, glossy leaves. After leaves are fully formed, the flower stem rises from the center of the new growth to form one of the most unusual flowers in the world. Best of all, they are ideal for home growing.

Temperature: Paphiopedilum is divided into two temperature groups: warm and cool growers. The attractive mottled-leaf types come from the temperate zones and do best with a night temperature, not below 60 degrees F. (preferably 65 degrees F.), and a day temperature of 75-85 degrees F. The solid green-leafed types come from the higher, cooler altitudes. They require a night temperature of 50-60 degrees F. and a day temperature of 70-80 degrees F.

Water: Paphiopedilum must be kept constantly moist or damp, but not soggy. Check frequently below the surface to determine the need for water. Normal watering intervals are between seven and ten days.

Light: Place in any bright window but protect from the mid-day sun. Leaves should be a medium-green color. If they are too pale or yellowish, the plant could be getting too much light. (Approximately the same light intensity as African Violets is preferred.)

Feeding: Good results may be obtained by using a high nitrogen fertilizer (25-9-9) all year round. Feed once a month at one-third of a teaspoon or less to a gallon of water. Paphiopedilum is sensitive to fertilizer burn.

Repotting: Paphiopedilum should be repotted every two to three years with a fresh, well-draining potting media, such as fine-grade orchid bark or Orchid Mix. It is important that the base of the growth be potted no deeper than ½” in the medium.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Phalaenopsis have become one of the most popular varieties of orchids because of their low maintenance and delicate balance of poise and elegance. These plants are commonly referred to as “Moth Orchids” and are considered among the easiest of the orchid family to care for as well as the most recognizable. The long-lasting flowers bloom perfectly for up to three months, providing you ample return on your investment. The flowering intervals vary with each plant, and you may be treated to a bloom as often as twice a year.

Temperature: Phalaenopsis enjoy much the same temperature range as we do. The minimum temperature at night is 60-65 °F, while the average daytime temperature should be around 75-85°F. Occasional deviations will not harm your plant, except when it is in the bud – chilly temperatures may cause the plant to stop budding.

Light: Phalaenopsis will flourish indoors under normal lighting conditions, with indirect sunlight being the most advantageous. Caution should be used when placing a Phalaenopsis in direct sunlight due to the fact that its leaves burn easily from too much exposure to the sun.

Water: Water often enough to keep continuous moisture just below the surface of the medium, but be cautious of over-watering. Watering once a week is normally sufficient to keep your plant healthy and happy.

Humidity: Phalaenopsis enjoy moist air, with a humidity level of 55-75% being ideal. Placing your plant over a tray or dish of water can increase moisture. Separate the pot and tray with pebbles or small stones to raise the height of your plant and ensure that it does not sit directly in the water.

Feeding: Good results may be obtained by using a high-nitrogen fertilizer year-round at 1 teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed your plant once a month. In this instance, less is more. So be sure not to overdo it.

Repotting: Plants should be repotted every other year and, because they grow upwards without spreading, can go back into the same sized pot. A medium-grade wood bark works well with the base of the bottom leaf at the surface of the medium. Water sparingly until new roots are well established.

Note: When the last flower drops, cut your flower spike halfway down the stem. Continue caring for it and wait for a possible rebloom.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

Vanda has become one of the favored darlings of the orchid world in the second half of the 20th century. The foliage, handsomely symmetrical and sculptural, provides an ideal setting for the compact, upright spike, which is densely set with richly colored, 2-inch flowers. In addition, the show from one spike can last for eight weeks or more, and vigorous plants, if adequately fertilized, can be expected to bloom twice yearly.

Temperature: The ideal day temperature is 75-85 degrees F., while the ideal night temperature is 65-75 degrees F. Occasional temperature extremes are tolerated if exposure is not prolonged.

Light: Vandas and their relatives require a good amount of light. They enjoy full sun in the morning, but will require shading from about 11 am-3 pm; less shading will be necessary for the late afternoon. Their leaves should be a light green color, and a darker green color indicates too little sun.

Water: Basically, Vandas grow best when their potting medium becomes dry in between waterings. These plants are epiphytes in nature, (i.e. growing on top of trees) and are used to drying out between the rains of their natural habitat.

Repotting: Vandas should not be repotted unless the plant has outgrown the pot (every 2 or 3 years) or when the potting medium begins to deteriorate. Or when the mixture becomes sour, does not drain rapidly, and is invaded by snow mold or shows green mold on the surface. A coarse medium such as medium-grade Fir-bark, or coarse-grade Fir-bark will work well.

Feeding: High nitrogen fertilizers ( 25-9-9) can be used all year round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

The Vuylstekeara varieties of orchids are becoming very popular for ease of growing and long-lasting sprays of small, distinct flowers which often have unique color combinations and a pleasant fragrance. They will typically bloom once a year and can be grown in the home, as well as in a sheltered area in the garden. Vuylstekeara has been combined with Oncidiums and other related orchid types through hybridizing to offer a seemingly endless array of striking color patterns.

Temperature: Vuylstekeara enjoys intermediate temperature ranges: 75-85 degrees F. day & 60-65 degrees F. at night.

Light:  The Vuylstekearas prefer bright light. The leaves should be bright green as opposed to dark green or reddish-green. Reddish green indicates too much light; dark green indicates not enough light.

Water: Vuylstekeara should become moderately dry between waterings. Generally, they require more water while the new shoot is growing and less once the bulb has formed. Fertilize your plants at least once a month. Take care to keep water out of the new growth at the base of the plant. Never allow the bottom of the pot to stand in water. Never use artificially softened water.

Humidity: Vuylstekeara enjoys moist air, requiring a minimum of 40-50% humidity in the immediate vicinity of the plant. Humidity should be increased with higher temperatures. The ideal humidity is between 55 and 75%, with as much ventilation or air movement as possible without any cold drafts. Humidity can be increased around the plant by placing the pot on an inverted saucer in a baking pan filled with pebbles, rock chips, etc., and water. Keep water level below the top of pebbles so that the plant will not have “wet feet” from setting in water. Morning misting of foliage is also helpful, especially during periods of hot weather.

Repotting: Repot Vuylstekeara at least every two years. As a general rule, repot them when the new shoot is two to three inches tall or when new roots appear. All the old mix should be removed from the roots and any dead roots should be removed. If dividing, keep the divisions in clumps of three to five mature bulbs. Medium to fine fir bark is preferred. The base of the new growth should be potted about ½” (no deeper) into the fresh bark. Keep mix barely damp until you see the new roots penetrating the bark, then resume normal watering.

Feeding: High nitrogen fertilizers ( 25-9-9) can be used all year round at one teaspoon per gallon of water. Feed once a month.

Orchid Flowers - How To Grow The 11 Best Varieties of Orchid Flowers

This handsome, glossy-leaved orchid hails from low to mid-elevation regions of South America. Of the 15 species of Zygopetalum, many are terrestrial. With multiple blooms that often in flower for 8 weeks, they make excellent cut flowers and are used commercially for this purpose. The pseudobulbs are eventually deciduous. This orchid’s generic name is derived from the Greek term for “yoked petal,” referring to the yoke-like growth at the base of the lower lip.

Temperature: Zygopetalum varieties of orchids will tolerate considerable summer heat as long as they have mild nighttime temperatures between 50-65 degrees F. Exposure to cold temperatures (down to 28 degrees F) for a few hours each night will not damage an acclimatized plant, but once the plant spikes or flowers, it should be protected from temperatures below 35 degrees F. Always keep these plants free from frost.

Light: Your Zygopetalum orchid enjoys the morning and afternoon sun but should be protected from hot midday sunlight. A light green leaf with just a hint of yellow indicates that the plant is receiving the maximum amount of sun it can take; a dark green leaf indicates that it needs more sunlight.

Water: Watering of Zygopetalum is a delicate balancing act. They should not be allowed to go dry, yet they don’t care for a soggy environment either. Watering once every seven to ten days is about right. As with everything else, special consideration must be given to the drying effects of varying ambient air temperature and humidity.

Feeding: High nitrogen fertilizers (25-9-9) should be used from February until July, while low nitrogen fertilizers (6-25-25) should be used from August until January. Feed one teaspoon to a gallon of water once a month.

Repotting: Repot every two to three years from February to June with a well-draining medium. Fine bark is suitable in mild summer climates, while a finer medium Orchid Mix works well in warmer summer areas.

Growing Orchids Outdoors

The best varieties of orchids, when carefully selected and properly cared for, can be some of the most exotic indoor or outdoor plants.

It is well known that there are certain regions throughout the world where the climate is comfortable for orchids for a good portion of the year. If these conditions can be met, lovely orchids can be successfully cultivated in these areas with some protection from excessive moisture, wind, and sun.

The plants can be left outside in frost-free areas the whole year long. It is possible to grow plants inside the home when frost threatens (or at temperatures lower than 40°F) where they will not be damaged by cold temperatures.

It’s all about choosing plants that are already adapted to your region.

Light

The deepest shade is not a good place for flowers, and orchids are not any different. Orchids are normally found in places where they are frequently exposed to dappled light. As the sun gets hotter, more mid-day shade is required; hence there are more shades to be used during the day, especially in humid or coastal areas. Your selection of plants will also be determined by how much light it requires.

Temperature

Most varieties of orchids will thrive in a temperature range from 40 to 90 degrees F. Of course, the particular temperature conditions you live in will also affect your choice of orchids.

Watering

There is no general rule regarding this, but will depend strongly on your choice of orchids and whether they will be grown under an actual canopy. It is generally agreed that any orchid plants need to have some air circulation space around their roots but are unlikely to survive excessive moisture at the roots.

Growing Orchids Indoors

There are many varieties of orchids that are ideal for an indoor plant. Once homeowners have succumbed and bought their very first orchid flowers or received one as a gift, they might be able to coax the plant to bloom again by meeting a few cultural requirements.

Despite the fact that orchids are often thought of as delicate, they are incredibly tough and tougher than most people imagine. Orchids can be grown in most homes, both indoors and outdoors, and the most common varieties of orchids have the characteristics of thriving in conditions of low moisture and moderate sunlight.

Light

In order for your orchids to bloom properly, being in the right lighting conditions is critical. It is ideal to use bright to medium-level light. A window on the east or south side of the house would have the best light.

The orchid is a plant that thrives in strong light, but direct sunlight can damage the orchid.

The color of the leaves indicates whether the amount of light is sufficient. A light green leaf with just a hint of yellow indicates that the plant is receiving the maximum amount of sun it can take; a dark green leaf indicates that it needs more sunlight.

Temperature

The three general categories of orchids include those that prefer cool, warm, and intermediate temperatures.

A thermometer with a wide measurement range is required to measure how the temperature varies in your orchid’s location. If you do that, you will know what to buy. Because some varieties of orchids can adapt to the climate differently and are more tolerant than others.

The cool-growing orchid thrives in night temperatures of around 50°F in winter and day temperatures not exceeding 70°F.

Orchids of intermediate growth need minimum nighttime temperatures around 60°F in the winter and daytime temperatures between 70°F and 85°F.

For orchids that grow well in warm environments and need plenty of light, nighttime temperatures should not reach 65°F. In the daytime, temperatures can range from 75° to 85°F.

If there is good air circulation, intermediate- or warm-growing orchids can withstand temperatures up to 85° or 90°F in the summer. A cool-growing orchid prefers to remain cool during the summer.

Watering

The most challenging part of growing orchids indoors is watering them.

It is advisable to grow epiphytic orchids in a loose soil mixture in loose, well-drained containers.

There needs to be enough moisture, thus the orchid should be drenched until it runs down out of the bottom of the pot. Then, allow the potting mixture to dry out completely, and only then proceed with watering the orchid again. It may seem that the orchid needs more water because of the top layer drying out quicker than the soil at the bottom does, but don’t be fooled.

If you are not sure if your orchid needs water, you can simply compare its weight before watering to its weight when watered. If you have experience growing orchids, you should wait a day before watering your plant if you are not sure whether or not to water it.

Furthermore, keep in mind that the orchids need less water while he is in resting mode and is not blooming or producing new growth. An orchid’s need for water increases with the emergence of new roots and shoots.

Reproduction of Orchid Flowers

The orchid is well known for its ability to attract pollinators for its reproductive cycle through its aroma, mimicry, and stealth.

If the orchids have a sweet-smelling scent, they attract bees; those that have an unpleasant smelling fragrance would often attract flies.

Also, the orchid can attract pollinators with visual mimicry since it mimics insects such as bees and butterflies with its patterns on its petals.

The slipper orchid uses a third technique called “stealth,” which is when it lures a prospective pollinator to the edge of its slippery pouch, causing it to fall in. It brushes against the pollinia when it finds the single exit.

There are some varieties of orchids that are pollinated by crawling insects, and thus the petals of these orchids brush the ground.

Insects alone, however, are not responsible for pollinating orchids. Miniature mammals, bats, hummingbirds, even in some cases wind, also play a significant role in pollinating the orchid.

The Future of Orchid Flowers

I am sincerely curious to know what the future holds for Orchidaceae. Now the biggest challenges that face the Earth are caused by Man.

Will the Orchidaceae survive the thread caused by the industries of our nations? Can we stop the process that started such a long time ago?

We will need to develop a strong system of environmental blockades that will prevent foreign policy organizations from influencing our agenda and reduce greenhouse gas emissions significantly by 2050 in order to achieve this.

Is the orchid really more resilient than we are as humans? How much longer can they survive in a world just like ours?

No matter how difficult the orchid’s existence becomes, it will still retain its elegance and prehistoric mystery in the minds of all who admire it.

Read More: Plant extinction

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